Актуальные

Nintendo Wii U

The Wii U is Nintendo's sixth home console and the first Nintendo console to produce 1080p high-definition graphics, and features a new controller with an embedded touchscreen. The controller allows a player to continue playing certain games by displaying the game even when the television is off. The system will be backwards compatible with Wii, and Wii U games can support compatibility with Wii peripherals, such as the Wii Remote Plus, Nunchuck, and Classic Controller Pro. It will not be backwards compatible with Nintendo GameCube media or peripherals.

Ouya

The Ouya is a microconsole running its own version of the Android operating system, developed by Boxer8. Julie Uhrman founded the project in 2012. She brought in designer Yves Béhar to collaborate on the design of the project, and Muffi Ghadiali as product manager to put together the engineering team. Development was funded via Kickstarter, raising $8.5 million and becoming the website's second-highest-earning project in its history. Units started to ship to Kickstarter backers on March 28, 2013. The console was released to the general public on June 25, 2013, and features an exclusive Ouya store for applications and games designed specifically for the Ouya platform, of which the majority are casual games targeted at or used by a mass audience of casual gamers. Out of the box, Ouya supports media apps such as TwitchTV and XBMC media player. It runs a modified version of Android 4.1 Jelly Bean, and is open to rooting without voiding the warranty (developer models ordered during the Kickstarter campaign for $699 or $1,337 come pre-rooted). The console's hardware design allows it to be easily opened up, requiring only a standard screwdriver for easy modding and possible hardware addons. All systems can be used as development kits, allowing any Ouya owner and gamer to also be a developer, without the need for licensing fees. All games are required to have some kind of free-to-play aspect, whether that be completely free, has a free trial, or has purchasable upgrades, levels, or other in-game items. The Ouya is classified as part of the eighth generation of video game consoles and as such is a rival competing against the PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and Wii U.

Все

Acorn Electron

The Acorn Electron is a budget version of the BBC Micro educational/home computer made by Acorn Computers Ltd. It has 32 kilobytes of RAM, and its ROM includes BBC BASIC v2 along with its operating system. The Electron was able to save and load programs onto audio cassette via a supplied converter cable that connected it to any standard tape recorder that had the correct sockets. It was capable of basic graphics, and could display onto either a television set, a colour (RGB) monitor or a "green screen" monitor. For a short period, the Electron was reportedly the best selling micro in the United Kingdom and total lifetime game sales for the Electron exceeded those of the BBC Micro.

Action Max

Action Max is a home video game console using VHS tapes for games. It was created in 1987 by Worlds of Wonder. The Action Max had a very limited release outside of the U.S. Inside the system. The Action Max motherboard. The Action Max system requires the player to also have a VCR, as the console has no way to play the requisite VHS tapes itself. Using light guns, players shoot at the screen. The gaming is strictly point-based and dependent on shot accuracy and as a result, players can't truly win or lose a game. The system's post-launch appeal was limited by this and by the fact that the only real genre on the system are light gun games that play exactly the same way every time, leading to its quick market decline.[1] Before playing, a red sensor must be attached to the lower right corner of the television screen. This corner contains a circle that was usually black, but flashes rapidly whenever something on the screen is targetable. At the same time, targets are highlighted by rapidly flashing panels for the player to shoot at. The console uses the corner circle and light from the targets (picked up by the guns) to determine when something has been hit. Flashes in sync with the corner circle count as enemy hits, and earn points for the player. Flashes out of sync with the corner circle count as friendly hits, losing points. With this implementation, the unit can function with copies of the original VHS tapes, including those on more modern formats such as DVD-R or personal computers. The console can work with any filmed footage properly formatted to function with the console's light gun. Games In all, five VHS cassettes were released for the system: .38 Ambush Alley, a police target range; Blue Thunder, based on the eponymous 1983 motion picture; Hydrosub: 2021, a futuristic underwater voyage; The Rescue of Pops Ghostly, a comic haunted-house adventure; and Sonic Fury, aerial combat, bundled with the system. A planned sixth cassette, Fright Night, was unreleased at the time Action Max was discontinued. Each game follows an identical gameplay format, differing only in theme, playing the same way each time. Technical specifications CPU: HD401010 Internal Speaker 2 Character, 7 segment LED score display

Atari 800

The Atari 8-bit family is a series of 8-bit home computers introduced by Atari, Inc. in 1979 and manufactured until 1992. All are based on the MOS Technology 6502 CPU running at 1.79 MHz, roughly twice that of similar designs, and were the first home computers designed with custom co-processor chips. This architecture allowed the Atari designs to offer graphics and sound capabilities that were more advanced than contemporary machines like the Apple II or Commodore PET, and gaming on the platform was a major draw; Star Raiders is widely considered the platform's killer app. Machines with similar performance would not appear until the BBC Micro in late 1981 and the Commodore 64 in 1982.

Atari ST

The Atari ST is a line of home computers from Atari Corporation and the successor to the Atari 8-bit family. The ST enjoyed success in gaming due to low cost, fast performance and colorful graphics. Notable individuals who developed games on the ST include Peter Molyneux, Doug Bell, Jeff Minter, Éric Chahi, Jez San, and David Braben. An early real-time 3D role-playing video game, Dungeon Master, was first developed and released on the ST, and was the best-selling software ever produced for the platform. Simulation games like Falcon and Flight Simulator II made use of the enhanced graphics found in the ST machines, as did many arcade ports. One game, MIDI Maze, uses the MIDI ports to connect up to 16 machines for interactive networked play. Games simultaneously released on the Amiga that had identical graphics and sound were often accused by video game magazines of simply being ST ports. The critically acclaimed game Another World was originally released for ST and Amiga in 1991 with the Polygonal engine developed on the ST and the rotoscoped animations created on the Amiga (the two games are very similar on both systems).

Commodore VIC-20

The VIC-20 is an 8-bit home computer which was sold by Commodore Business Machines. The VIC-20 was announced in 1980, roughly three years after Commodore's first personal computer, the PET. The VIC-20 was the first computer of any description to sell one million units. As for commercial software offerings, an estimated 300 titles were available on cartridge, and another 500+ titles were available on tape. By comparison, the Atari 2600—the most popular of the video game consoles at the time—had a library of about 900 titles near the end of its production life (although many titles were extremely similar). Most cartridge games were ready to play as soon as the VIC-20 was turned on, as opposed to games on tape which required a time-consuming loading process. Titles on cartridge included Gorf, Cosmic Cruncher, Sargon II Chess, and many others. A handful of disk applications were released for the VIC-20.

Dragon 32/64

The Dragon 32 and Dragon 64 are home computers that were built in the 1980s. The Dragons are very similar to the TRS-80 Color Computer, and were produced for the European market by Dragon Data, Ltd., in Port Talbot, Wales, and for the US market by Tano of New Orleans, Louisiana. The model numbers reflect the primary difference between the two machines, which have 32 and 64 kilobytes of RAM, respectively. Initially, the Dragon was reasonably well supported by the major UK software companies with versions of popular games from other systems being ported to the Dragon. Examples of top selling games available for the Dragon include Arcadia (Imagine), Chuckie Egg (A&F), Manic Miner and sequel Jet Set Willy (Software Projects), Hunchback (Ocean) and Football Manager (Addictive). There were also companies that concentrated on the Dragon such as Microdeal. Their character Cuthbert appeared in several games on the Dragon with Cuthbert Goes Walkabout also being converted for Atari 8-bit and Commodore 64 systems.

Epoch Cassette Vision

The Cassette Vision (Japanese: カセットビジョン Hepburn: Kasetto Bijon?) is a home video game console made by Epoch Co. and released in Japan on July 30, 1981. There is also a remodel called the Cassette Vision Jr. The terms cassette, and more commonly tape, are contemporary synonyms for ROM cartridge, not to be confused with the magnetic cassette tape format. In terms of power, it is comparable to the Atari 2600. The Cassette Vision has unusual controls: four knobs built into the console itself, two for each player (one for horizontal, one for vertical); plus two buttons per player. The system originally retailed for 13,500 yen, with games priced at 4,000. Though the Cassette Vision was not a high seller,[citation needed] it received a successor called the Super Cassette Vision (スーパーカセットビジョン Sūpā Kasetto Bijon?) As a 1984 machine, it is more comparable to the likes of the Family Computer and the Atari 7800. The SCV was also sold in Europe, but with little known success.[citation needed] The Super Lady Cassette Vision, a version of the Super Cassette Vision that was aimed at a female market, was released exclusively in Japan. While the specs were exactly the same the plastic was a pink color and included a carrying case and the "Milky Princess" game.

Epoch Super Cassette Vision

The Cassette Vision (Japanese: カセットビジョン Hepburn: Kasetto Bijon?) is a home video game console made by Epoch Co. and released in Japan on July 30, 1981. There is also a remodel called the Cassette Vision Jr. The terms cassette, and more commonly tape, are contemporary synonyms for ROM cartridge, not to be confused with the magnetic cassette tape format. In terms of power, it is comparable to the Atari 2600. The Cassette Vision has unusual controls: four knobs built into the console itself, two for each player (one for horizontal, one for vertical); plus two buttons per player. The system originally retailed for 13,500 yen, with games priced at 4,000. Though the Cassette Vision was not a high seller,[citation needed] it received a successor called the Super Cassette Vision (スーパーカセットビジョン Sūpā Kasetto Bijon?) As a 1984 machine, it is more comparable to the likes of the Family Computer and the Atari 7800. The SCV was also sold in Europe, but with little known success.[citation needed] The Super Lady Cassette Vision, a version of the Super Cassette Vision that was aimed at a female market, was released exclusively in Japan. While the specs were exactly the same the plastic was a pink color and included a carrying case and the "Milky Princess" game.

Fairchild Channel F

The Fairchild Channel F debuted August 1976 for $169.99 USD (about $700 USD in 2014) as the Fairchild Video Entertainment System (VES) later changing the console name to Fairchild Channel F when the Atari (VCS) 2600 was released. The "F" in Fairchild Channel F stood for the microprocessor the Fairchild F8. The system had signs of good success for the first year but was short lived do to the release of the Atari (VCS) 2600 and production of the console ceased in 1978. Despite the short life of the Fairchild Channel F it brought us many first that we take for granted. The Fairchild Channel F was the first system to make use of the microprocessor. This is important because the microprocessor allowed for another first, playing against a computer opponent. Finally the first that none of us would know what to do with out, the pause feature, to freeze game play. Now technically on the Fairchild Channel F the button was called "hold" but it was the first to allow a player to freeze game play and resume at a later time, it was just given the name "pause" later on the Atari 5200.

Famicom Disk System

The Family Disk System was released on February 21, 1986 by Nintendo as a peripheral for the Nintendo Family Computer console in Japan. It uses proprietary floppy disks (called "Disk Cards") for data storage. The Disk System's Disk Cards are somewhat proprietary 71 mm × 76 mm (2.8x3 in) 56K-per-side double-sided floppy. These "Disk Cards," as they are officially called, were a slight modification of Mitsumi's "Quick Disk" 89 mm 2.8 in square disk format which is used in a handful of Japanese computers and various synthesizer keyboards, along with a few word processors. Some of the QuickDisk drives even made it into devices in Europe and North America, though they are somewhat rare. Mitsumi already had close relations with Nintendo, as it manufactured the Famicom and NES consoles, and possibly other Nintendo hardware.

Magnavox Odyssey 1

The Magnavox Odyssey is the first commercial home video game console. It was developed by a small team led by Ralph H. Baer at Sanders Associates and released by Magnavox in the United States in September 1972 and overseas the following year. The Odyssey consists of a white, black, and brown box which connects to a television set and two rectangular controllers attached by wires. It is capable of displaying three square dots on the screen in monochrome black and white, with different behavior of the dots depending on the game played, and has no sound capabilities. Players place plastic overlays on the screen to create visuals, and the one or two players for each game control their dots with the three knobs and one button on the controller in accordance with the rules given for the game. The Odyssey console came packaged with dice, paper money, and other board game paraphernalia to go along with the games, and a peripheral controller—the first video game light gun—was sold separately. The idea for a video game console was thought up by Baer in August 1966, and over the next three years he, along with Bill Harrison and Bill Rusch, created seven successive prototype consoles. The seventh, known as the Brown Box, was shown to several manufacturers before Magnavox agreed to produce it in January 1971. After releasing the console in September 1972 through their dealerships, Magnavox sold between 69,000 and 100,000 units by the end of the year, and 350,000 by the time the console was discontinued in 1975. The console spawned the Magnavox Odyssey series of dedicated consoles, as well as the 1978 Magnavox Odyssey². One of the 28 games made for the system, a ping pong game, was an inspiration for Atari's successful Pong arcade game, in turn driving sales of the console. Baer's patents for the console and the games, including what was termed by a judge as "the pioneering patent of the video game art", formed the basis of a series of lawsuits over 20 years, earning Sanders and Magnavox over US$100 million. The release of the Odyssey marked the end of the early history of video games, and the rise of the commercial video game industry along with the start of the first generation of video game consoles.

MSX

N-Gage

The N-Gage is a feature phone and handheld game system from Nokia, announced on 4 November 2002 and released on 7 October 2003. It runs on the original Series 60 on Symbian OS v6.1. N-Gage attempted to lure gamers away from the Game Boy Advance by including mobile phone functionality. This was unsuccessful, partly because the buttons, designed for a phone, were not well-suited for gaming and when used as a phone the original N-Gage was described as resembling a "taco", which led to it becoming a well-known mocking nickname along with the "Frankenphone"

Nintendo Switch

The Nintendo Switch (Japanese: ニンテンドースイッチ Hepburn: Nintendō Suitchi?), is an upcoming video game console developed by Nintendo, and the company's seventh major home console. Originally known in development as the NX, it was officially unveiled in October 2016 and is scheduled for release worldwide on March 3, 2017. The Switch is a "hybrid" console, allowing different modes of play. Its main unit is shaped like a tablet computer which can be used portably as-is, or connected to a television display through a detachable docking station. In addition it can also be used in a tapletop form with its kickstand. Despite these characteristics, Nintendo markets the Switch primarily as a home console rather than as a portable. Its most distinguishable feature are the "Joy-Con" controllers. These are two detachable controllers that can be either attached to a "Grip" to provide a traditional home console gamepad form, attached on either side of the main unit for handheld play, or can be used individually in the hand like Nintendo's Wii Remote. The Joy-Cons are similarly motion-sensitive, and feature NFC for reading Amiibo data. The Switch uses flash ROM cartridges for media, rather than optical discs.

Nuon

Nuon is a technology developed by VM Labs that adds features to a DVD player. In addition to viewing DVDs, one can play 3D video games and use enhanced DVD navigational tools such as zoom and smooth scanning of DVD playback. One could also play CDs while the Nuon graphics processor generates synchronized graphics on the screen. There were plans to provide Internet access capability in the next generation of Nuon-equipped DVD players.

PC-88

The PC-8801 is a Zilog Z80-based home computer released by Nippon Electric Company (NEC) in 1981 in Japan, where it became very popular. The PC-8801 is informally called the PC-88. Companies that produced exclusive software for the NEC PC-8801 included Enix, Square, Sega, Nihon Falcom, Bandai, HAL Laboratory, ASCII, Pony Canyon, Technology and Entertainment Software, Wolf Team, Dempa, Champion Soft, Starcraft, Micro Cabin, PSK, and Bothtec. Certain games produced for the PC-8801 had a shared release with the MSX, such as those produced by Game Arts, ELF Corporation, and Konami. Many popular series first appeared on the NEC PC-8801, including Snatcher, Thexder, Dragon Slayer, RPG Maker, and Ys. Nintendo licensed Hudson Soft to port some of Nintendo's Family Computer games for the console, including Excitebike, Balloon Fight, Tennis, Donkey Kong 3, Golf, and Ice Climber, as well as new editions of Mario Bros. called Mario Bros. Special and Punch Ball Mario Bros. and a unique Super Mario Bros. game for the computer, Super Mario Bros. Special.

PC-98

The PC-9801 is a Japanese 16-bit microcomputer manufactured by NEC from 1982, the first in the PC-9800 series of 16-bit and 32-bit personal computers. The PC9801 had thousands of game titles designed for it, many of which made creative use of the system's limitations (it was originally designed as a business machine) to great commercial success. Despite having hardware specifications far inferior to the Fujitsu FM Towns and Sharp X68000 personal computers, the massive install base and steady flow of game titles (in particular "doujin" style dating sims and RPGs, as well as early games of the Touhou Project franchise) kept it as the favored platform for PC game developers in Japan until the rise of the DOS/V clones.

PC-FX

The PC-FX is a 32-bit home video game console made by NEC Corporation. It was released in Japan on December 23, 1994, just weeks after Sony's PlayStation and a month after the Sega Saturn. It is the successor to NEC's PC Engine, known as TurboGrafx-16 in North America. Unlike its predecessor, the PC-FX was only released in Japan. The console is shaped just like a tower PC and was meant to be similarly upgradeable. However the PC-FX was using an outdated graphics chip that rendered the system underpowered in comparison to its competitors, which caused it to be a commercial failure. A lack of developers' support also meant inadequate games and as a result it was unable to compete effectively with its fifth generation peers. The PC-FX was NEC's last home video game console, and was discontinued in February 1998.

SEGA SG-1000

The SG-1000 is a cartridge-based home video game console manufactured by Sega and released in Japan, Australia, and other countries. This system marked Sega's first entry into the home video game hardware business, and provided the basis for the more successful Master System. The SG-1000's game library comprises 68 standard cartridge releases and 29 Sega Card releases. All of the SG-1000's games play on each model of the console, though 26 of the cartridge releases require the attached keyboard accessory or the SC-3000. In addition, all titles are fully compatible with the Mark III and Master System. Titles for the system include Flicky, Congo Bongo, Sega-Galaga, and Girl's Garden, the first video game directed by Sonic the Hedgehog creator Yuji Naka. The game library for the SG-1000 also included licensed titles, such as Golgo 13.

Sharp X68000

The X68000 is a home computer created by Sharp Corporation, first released in 1987, sold only in Japan. In terms of hardware, it is very similar to arcade machines of the time, and serves as the Capcom CPS system development machine. It supports separate text RAM, graphic RAM and hardware sprites. Sound is produced internally via Yamaha's then top-of-the-line YM2151 FM synthesizer and a single channel OKI MSM6258V for PCM. Due to this and other similarities, it played host to many arcade game ports in its day. Games made for this system include Parodius Da! -Shinwa kara Owarai e-, Ghouls 'n Ghosts, Strider, Final Fight, Alien Syndrome, Street Fighter II Dash, Akumajo Dracula (Castlevania in other regions, the X68000 version was ported to the PlayStation as Castlevania Chronicles), Cho Ren Sha 68k (which has a Windows port) and many others. Many games also supported the Roland SC-55 and MT-32 MIDI modules for sound as well as mixed-mode internal/external output.

Texas Instruments TI-99/4A

The Texas Instruments TI-99/4A is a home computer, released June 1981 in the United States at a price of $525 ($1,366 adjusted for inflation). It is an enhanced version of the less successful TI-99/4 model, which was released in late 1979 at a price of $1,150 ($3,749 adjusted for inflation). The TI-99/4 had a calculator-style chiclet keyboard and a character set that lacked lowercase text. The TI-99/4A added an additional graphics mode, "lowercase" characters consisting of small capitals, and a full-travel keyboard. Both used 16-bit processors, making the TI-99/4 series the first 16-bit home computers.

Tomy Tutor

The Tomy Tutor, originally sold in Japan as the Pyūta (ぴゅう太?) and in the UK as the Grandstand Tutor, is a home computer produced by the Japanese toymaker Tomy. It was architecturally similar, but not identical, to the Texas Instruments TI-99/4A, and used a similar 16-bit CPU. The computer was launched on the UK and European markets in late 1983. Outside Japan, however, sales were not significant. Produced by Matsushita, the machine was released in Japan in 1982 under the name of Tomy Pyūta. Tomy described the Tutor, with 16K RAM, as good for games and education. The company stated that its documentation would let an eight-year-old child use the computer without adult supervision. One of the major flaws pointed out with the Tutor was not its hardware, but its marketing: the Tutor was announced as a children's computer when in fact it was practically a cheap, evolved version of the TI-99/4A, even having a similar 16-bit CPU (the TMS 9995, closely related to the TI-99/4's TMS 9990);[1] other competitors in its price range still used 8-bit microprocessors. The Tutor did not sell well against the ZX Spectrum in the UK and the Commodore 64 in other countries. It ended up being removed quickly from the market and replaced the following year by the Tomy Tutor MK II with a standard mechanical keyboard instead of the original "Chiclet"-style keyboard. However, the new model seems to have been sold only in Japan, and even then only for a short period of time. The Pyūta Jr. was a console version of the Pyūta, and similarly was only sold in Japan.

Amstrad

Amstrad CPC

The Amstrad CPC (short for Colour Personal Computer) is a series of 8-bit home computers produced by Amstrad between 1984 and 1990. It was designed to compete in the mid-1980s home computer market dominated by the Commodore 64 and the Sinclair ZX Spectrum, where it successfully established itself primarily in the United Kingdom, France, Spain, and the German-speaking parts of Europe. The series spawned a total of six distinct models: The CPC464, CPC664, and CPC6128 were highly successful competitors in the European home computer market. The later plus models, 464plus and 6128plus, efforts to prolong the system's lifecycle with hardware updates, were considerably less successful, as was the attempt to repackage the plus hardware into a game console as the GX4000. The CPC models' hardware is based on the Zilog Z80A CPU, complemented with either 64 or 128 kB of memory. Their computer-in-a-keyboard design prominently features an integrated storage device, either a compact cassette deck or 3" floppy disk drive. The main units were only sold bundled with a colour or monochrome monitor that doubles as the main unit's power supply. Additionally, a wide range of first and third party hardware extensions such as external disk drives, printers, and memory extensions, was available. The CPC series was pitched against other home computers primarily used to play video games and enjoyed a strong supply of game software. The comparatively low price for a complete computer system with dedicated monitor, its high resolution monochrome text and graphic capabilities and the possibility to run CP/M software also rendered the system attractive for business users, which was reflected by a wide selection of application software.

Apple

Atari

Atari 2600

The Atari 2600 is a video game console released in October 1977 by Atari, Inc. It is credited with popularizing the use of microprocessor-based hardware and cartridges containing game code, instead of having non-microprocessor dedicated hardware with all games built in. The first game console to use this format was the Fairchild Channel F; however, the Atari 2600 receives credit for making the plug-in concept popular among the game-playing public. The console was originally sold as the Atari VCS, for Video Computer System. Following the release of the Atari 5200, in 1982, the VCS was renamed "Atari 2600", after the unit's Atari part number, CX2600. The 2600 was typically bundled with two joystick controllers, a conjoined pair of paddle controllers, and a cartridge game—initially Combat and later Pac-Man. The Atari 2600 was wildly successful, and during much of the 1980s, "Atari" was a synonym for this model in mainstream media and, by extension, for video games in general.

Atari 5200

The Atari 5200 SuperSystem, commonly known as the Atari 5200, is a video game console that was introduced in 1982 by Atari Inc. as a higher end complementary console for the popular Atari 2600. The 5200 was created to compete with the Intellivision, but wound up more directly competing with the ColecoVision shortly after its release. The 5200 was based on Atari Inc.'s existing 400/800 computers and the internal hardware was almost identical, although software was not directly compatible between the two systems. The 5200's controllers feature an analog joystick and a numeric keypad along with start, pause and reset buttons. The 360-degree non-centering joystick was touted as offering more control than the four-position joystick controller offered with the Atari 2600.

Atari 7800

The Atari 7800 ProSystem, or simply the Atari 7800, is a video game console re-released by Atari Corporation in January 1986. The original release had occurred two years earlier under Atari Inc. The 7800 had originally been designed to replace Atari Inc.'s Atari 5200 in 1984, but was temporarily shelved due to the sale of the company after the video game crash. In January 1986, the 7800 was again released and would compete that year with the Nintendo Entertainment System and the Sega Master System. It had simple digital joysticks; it was almost fully backward-compatible with the Atari 2600(and was the first console to have backward compatibility without the use of additional modules); and it was considered affordable at a price of US$140.

Atari Jaguar

The Atari Jaguar is a video game console that was released by Atari Corporation in 1993. It was the last to be marketed under the Atari brand until the release of the Atari Flashback in 2004. It was designed to surpass the Mega Drive/Genesis, Super Nintendo Entertainment System, and the Panasonic 3DO in processing power. Although launched one year earlier, it was eventually in competition with the Sega Saturn, the Sony PlayStation, and other consoles that made up the fifth generation of video game consoles. The console was first released in New York City and San Francisco on November 23, 1993, and the rest of the country in early 1994. Although it was promoted as the first 64-bit gaming system, the Jaguar proved to be a commercial failure and prompted Atari to leave the home video game console market. Despite its commercial failure, the Jaguar has a dedicated fan base that produces homebrew games for it.

Atari Jaguar CD

The Atari Jaguar CD or Jag CD is a CD-ROM peripheral for the Atari Jaguar video game console. Late in the life span of the company, Atari released this long-promised CD-ROM unit. The unit hit shelves on September 11, 1995 and retailed for $149.95. The device sat atop the Jaguar console, snapping very firmly into the cartridge slot, and had a funnel-like shape. The drive had its own cartridge slot to allow cartridge games to be played without removing the CD drive. There was a separate "Memory Track" cartridge for storing saved game position and high scores. The Jaguar CD unit featured a double speed (2x) drive and built-in VLM (Virtual Light Machine) software written by Jeff Minter. The VLM, which provided a sophisticated video light show when an audio CD was played in the machine, was as popular among buyers as the games themselves. Packaged with the drive were two games (Blue Lightning and Vid Grid), a music CD (Tempest 2000 soundtrack), and a Myst demo disc. Also, the startup screen was different than that of the cartridge-based Jaguar: using the VLM banks it created a random 'light show' that was different every time the console was switched on. However, the startup was silent.

Atari XE

Atari Corp. brought out the XE Game System (XEGS) in 1987. The XE Game System was sold bundled with a detachable keyboard, a joystick and a light gun (XG-1), and a couple of game cartridges (Bug Hunt and Flight Simulator II). The XE Game System was essentially a repackaged 65XE, and was compatible with almost all Atari 8-bit software and hardware as a result.

Bandai

WonderSwan

The WonderSwan was a line of handheld game consoles produced in Japan by Bandai. It was developed by Gunpei Yokoi's company Koto and Bandai. The WonderSwan was made to compete with the Neo Geo Pocket Color and the market leader Nintendo's Game Boy Color (even though the developer for the WonderSwan, Gunpei Yokoi, developed the original Nintendo Game Boy). The original WonderSwan was later replaced by the WonderSwan Color; although some WonderSwan Color games are compatible with the original WonderSwan, many are designed exclusively for the WonderSwan Color and show a message such as "This cartridge is for WonderSwan Color only" when run on the original WonderSwan. The WonderSwan is playable both vertically and horizontally, and feature a fairly large library of games, including numerous first-party titles based on licensed anime properties, with significant third-party support from Square and Capcom. As it was a console designed essentially for the Japanese market, most of the games are in Japanese, with only a few featuring English text.

WonderSwan Color

The WonderSwan Color was released on December 9, 2000 in Japan, and was a moderate success. The original WonderSwan had only a black and white screen. Although the WonderSwan Color was slightly larger and heavier (7 mm and 2 g) compared to the original WonderSwan, the color version featured 512KB of RAM and a larger color LCD screen. In addition, the WonderSwan Color is compatible with the original WonderSwan library of games. Prior to WonderSwan's release, Nintendo had a virtual monopoly in the Japanese video game handheld market. After the release of the WonderSwan Color, Bandai took approximately 8% of the market share in Japan partly due to its low price of ¥6800 Japanese yen (approximately $59 USD). Another reason for the WonderSwan's success in Japan was the fact that Bandai managed to get a deal with Square to port over the original Famicom Final Fantasy games with improved graphics and controls. However, with the popularity of the Game Boy Advance and the reconciliation between Square and Nintendo, the WonderSwan Color and its successor, the SwanCrystal, quickly lost its competitive advantage.

Coleco

Commodore

Commodore International

Epyx / Atari

Google, Android Inc.

Hudson Soft

IBM

Magnavox / Philips

Mattel

Microsoft

Nintendo

Nintendo DS

The Nintendo DS (abbreviated to DS or NDS) is a portable game console produced by Nintendo, first released on November 21, 2004. A distinctive feature of the system is the presence of two separate LCD screens, the lower of which is a touchscreen, encompassed within a clamshell design, similar to the Game Boy Advance SP. The Nintendo DS also features a built-in microphone and supports wireless standards, allowing players to interact with each other within short range, or online with the Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection service. The Nintendo DS is the first Nintendo console to be released in North America before Japan.

Nintendo Entertainment System (NES)

The Nintendo Entertainment System (also abbreviated as NES or simply called Nintendo) is an 8-bit video game console that was released by Nintendo in North America during 1985, in Europe during 1986 and Australia in 1987. In most of Asia, including Japan (where it was first launched in 1983), China, Vietnam, Singapore, the Middle East and Hong Kong, it was released as the Family Computer, commonly shortened as either the romanized contraction Famicom, or abbreviated to FC. In South Korea, it was known as the Hyundai Comboy, and was distributed by Hynix which then was known as Hyundai Electronics. As the best-selling gaming console of its time, the NES helped revitalize the US video game industry following the video game crash of 1983, and set the standard for subsequent consoles of its generation. With the NES, Nintendo introduced a now-standard business model of licensing third-party developers, authorizing them to produce and distribute software for Nintendo's platform.

Nintendo Game Boy Color

The Game Boy Color is Nintendo's successor to the 8-bit Game Boy handheld game console, and was released on October 21, 1998 in Japan, November 19, 1998 in North America, November 23, 1998 in Europe and November 27, 1998 in the United Kingdom. It features a color screen and is slightly thicker and taller than the Game Boy Pocket. As with the original Game Boy, it has an 8-bit processor. The Game Boy and Game Boy Color combined have sold 118.69 million units worldwide.

Nintendo GameCube

The Nintendo GameCube was the first Nintendo console to use optical discs as its primary storage medium, after several aborted projects from Nintendo and its partners to utilize optical-based storage media. In contrast with the GameCube's contemporary competitors, Sony's PlayStation 2, Sega's Dreamcast and Microsoft's Xbox, the GameCube uses miniDVD-based discs instead of full-size DVDs. Partially as a result of this, it does not have the DVD-Video playback functionality of these systems, nor the audio CD playback ability of other consoles that use full-size optical discs. In addition, the GameCube introduced a variety of connectivity options to Nintendo consoles, and was the fourth Nintendo console, after the Nintendo 64DD, Famicom Modem and Satellaview, to support online play officially, via the Nintendo GameCube Broadband Adapter and Modem Adapter (sold separately). It also enabled connectivity to the Game Boy Advance to access exclusive features of certain games or to use the portable system as a controller for the Game Boy Player.

Nintendo Virtual Boy

The Virtual Boy was a table-top video game console developed and manufactured by Nintendo. It was the first video game console that was supposed to be capable of displaying "true 3D graphics" out of the box, in a form of virtual reality. Whereas most video games use monocular cues to achieve the illusion of three dimensions on a two-dimensional screen, The Virtual Boy creates an illusion of depth through the effect known as parallax. In a manner similar to using a head-mounted display, the user looks into an eyepiece made of neoprene on the front of the machine, and then an eyeglass-style projector allows viewing of the monochromatic (in this case, red) image. It was released on July 21, 1995 in Japan and August 14, 1995 in North America at a price of around US$180. It then became a commercial failure and it was not released in PAL markets. It met with a lukewarm reception that was unaffected by continued price drops. Nintendo discontinued it the following year.

Nintendo Wii

The Wii is a home video game console released by Nintendo on November 19, 2006. As a seventh-generation console, the Wii primarily competes with Microsoft's Xbox 360 and Sony's PlayStation 3. Nintendo states that its console targets a broader demographic than that of the two others. As of November 2011, the Wii leads the generation over the PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360 in worldwide sales, and in December 2009 broke the record for best-selling console in a single month in the United States. A distinguishing feature of the console is its wireless controller, the Wii Remote, which can be used as a handheld pointing device and detects movement in three dimensions. Another distinctive feature of the console is WiiConnect24, which enables it to receive messages and updates over the Internet while in standby mode. The Wii is Nintendo's fifth home console and the direct successor of the Nintendo GameCube, being fully backwardly compatible with all GameCube games and most accessories.

Nintendo Wii U

The Wii U is Nintendo's sixth home console and the first Nintendo console to produce 1080p high-definition graphics, and features a new controller with an embedded touchscreen. The controller allows a player to continue playing certain games by displaying the game even when the television is off. The system will be backwards compatible with Wii, and Wii U games can support compatibility with Wii peripherals, such as the Wii Remote Plus, Nunchuck, and Classic Controller Pro. It will not be backwards compatible with Nintendo GameCube media or peripherals.

Super Nintendo (SNES)

The Super Nintendo Entertainment System (also known as the Super NES, SNES or Super Nintendo) is a 16-bit video game console that was released by Nintendo in North America, Europe, Australasia (Oceania), and South America between 1990 and 1993. In Japan and Southeast Asia, the system is called the Super Famicom (officially adopting the abbreviated name of its predecessor, the Family Computer), or SFC for short. In South Korea, it is known as the Super Comboy and was distributed by Hyundai Electronics. Although each version is essentially the same, several forms of regional lockout prevent the different versions from being compatible with one another. The Super Nintendo Entertainment System was Nintendo's second home console, following the Nintendo Entertainment System (NES). The console introduced advanced graphics and sound capabilities compared with other consoles at the time. Additionally, development of a variety of enhancement chips (which were integrated on game circuit boards) helped to keep it competitive in the marketplace. The SNES was a global success, becoming the best-selling console of the 16-bit era despite its relatively late start and the fierce competition it faced in North America and Europe from Sega's Genesis console. The SNES remained popular well into the 32-bit era, and although Nintendo no longer offers factory repairs/replacement or accessories for the console, it continues to be popular among fans, collectors, retro gamers, and emulation enthusiasts, some of whom are still making homebrew ROM images.

Ouya, Inc.

Ouya

The Ouya is a microconsole running its own version of the Android operating system, developed by Boxer8. Julie Uhrman founded the project in 2012. She brought in designer Yves Béhar to collaborate on the design of the project, and Muffi Ghadiali as product manager to put together the engineering team. Development was funded via Kickstarter, raising $8.5 million and becoming the website's second-highest-earning project in its history. Units started to ship to Kickstarter backers on March 28, 2013. The console was released to the general public on June 25, 2013, and features an exclusive Ouya store for applications and games designed specifically for the Ouya platform, of which the majority are casual games targeted at or used by a mass audience of casual gamers. Out of the box, Ouya supports media apps such as TwitchTV and XBMC media player. It runs a modified version of Android 4.1 Jelly Bean, and is open to rooting without voiding the warranty (developer models ordered during the Kickstarter campaign for $699 or $1,337 come pre-rooted). The console's hardware design allows it to be easily opened up, requiring only a standard screwdriver for easy modding and possible hardware addons. All systems can be used as development kits, allowing any Ouya owner and gamer to also be a developer, without the need for licensing fees. All games are required to have some kind of free-to-play aspect, whether that be completely free, has a free trial, or has purchasable upgrades, levels, or other in-game items. The Ouya is classified as part of the eighth generation of video game consoles and as such is a rival competing against the PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and Wii U.

Philips

Sega

Sega 32X

The Sega 32X, codenamed Project Mars, is an add-on for the Mega Drive/Genesis video game console by Sega. Its aim was to increase the lifespan of the aging Mega Drive/Genesis system, which was facing stiff competition from the SNES. While connecting it to Mega Drive did increase its capabilities, reluctance to adapt due to the previous failure of the Mega-CD and the upcoming Sega Saturn system led to low sales and a short lifespan. It was distributed under the name Sega Super 32X in Japan, Sega Genesis 32X in North America, Sega Mega Drive 32X in the PAL region, and Sega Mega 32X in Brazil.

Sega CD

The Mega-CD is an add-on device for the Mega Drive video game console, designed and produced by Sega and released in Japan, Europe, Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa. The device was also released in North America under the name Sega CD, for the Sega Genesis. The device adds a CD-ROM drive to the console, allowing the user to play CD-based games and providing additional hardware functionality. It can also play audio CDs and CD+G discs. The development of the Mega-CD was confidential; game developers were not made aware of what exactly they were working on until the add-on was finally revealed at the Tokyo Toy Show in Japan. The Mega-CD was designed to compete with the PC Engine CD (TurboGrafx-16 CD) in Japan, which had a separate CD-ROM drive. The first version of the Mega-CD sits underneath the Mega Drive console and loads CDs via a motorized tray. A second version places a top-loading CD-ROM drive to the right of the console and is intended primarily for use with the redesigned Sega Mega Drive 2. Both versions of the Mega-CD are compatible with the initial two versions of the Mega Drive console, but not with the Mega Drive 3 or Genesis 3.

Sega Genesis

The Sega Genesis is a fourth-generation video game console developed and produced by Sega. It was originally released in Japan in 1988 as Mega Drive, then in North America in 1989 as Sega Genesis, and in Europe, Australia and other PAL regions in 1990 as Mega Drive. The reason for the two names is that Sega was unable to secure legal rights to the Mega Drive name in North America. The Sega Genesis is Sega's third console and the successor to the Sega Master System with which it has backward compatibility. The controversy over games like Mortal Kombat in the United States forced Sega to create the first content rating system for video games, the Videogame Rating Council, rather than have the games heavily censored. The rating system allowed Sega to ship games with little to no censorship and gave it a competive edge when the same game was released by Nintendo. The success of those games eventually forced Nintendo to join its rating system.

Sega Master System

The Master System (abbreviated to SMS) is a third-generation video game console that was manufactured and released by Sega in 1985 in Japan (as the Sega Mark III), 1986 in North America and 1987 in Europe. The original SMS could play both cartridges and the credit card-sized "Sega Cards," which retailed for cheaper prices than cartridges but had less code. The SMS also featured accessories such as a light gun and 3D glasses which were designed to work with a range of specially coded games. The Master System was released as a direct competitor to the Nintendo Entertainment System in the third videogame generation The SMS was technically superior to the NES, which predated its release significantly, but failed to overturn Nintendo's significant market share advantage in Japan and North America.

Sinclair Research Ltd.

SNK

Sony

The 3DO Company